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Prime and Composite Numbers; Prime Factorization

26 Feb

We’re studying the above topic and here are some resources I found: (various grades from 3rd – 7th)

Prime and Composite Numbers

Prime Numbers Lesson Plan for Grades 3-4

Am I Prime? Lesson plan  for Grade 7

Prime Numbers Lesson Plan (PDF) for grades 4-6

Prime and Composite Numbers lesson plan for middle school

link to printable version of the above lesson plan

The Prime Team, sixth grade lesson plan

Prime and Composite Numbers with the use of manipulatives

 Cute activity using 100 chart. When student is finished crossing off numbers, only primes are left.

More than you probably ever want to know about prime numbers here. 🙂 Just thought my son would like the chart.

Prime Factorization and Factorization Trees

Why Learn Prime Factorization? How does it apply to the real world? (humorous and useful for those students who can’t focus on doing something  they don’t know why they are learning it)

 “Pretty Good Guide to Prime Factorization”

Lesson Plan on Prime Factorization and Factor Trees (PDF)

Seventh Grade Prime Factorization Lesson and practice (HTML)

Factoring Numbers Lesson from Purple Math

Modeling Prime Factorization Lesson

Prime and Composite Numbers/Prime Factorization  lesson plan from  lessonplanspage.com

I went through my NCDPI  (learnnc.org–NC has some of the best education stuff from state education departments that I have seen on the net) printables (Week by Week Essentials) and pulled out related prime/composite, prime factorization problems for quizzes, practice and warmups:

Prime/Composite Number Warmups/Quiz Material/Practice

Write the primer numbers between 1 and 10

Write the prime numbers between 10 and 20

Write the prime numbers between 20 and 30

Write the prime numbers between 30 and 40

Write the primer numbers between 40 and 50

Sum of the first four prime numbers

What is the sum of the first eight prime numbers.

List the prime factors of 35

Can the sum of two prime numbers be a prime

number? Explain.

List the prime numbers from 2 to 20

Largest prime factor of 100

Sum of the first five prime numbers

Give the prime factorization of 144.

Write the prime factorization of 1,408.

Give the prime factorization of 56.

Give the prime factorization of 375.

Write the prime factorization of 200.

Write the prime factorization of 162.

Write the prime factorization of 440.

Write the prime factorization of 600.

Write the prime factorization of 188.

Write the prime factorization of 48.

Give the prime factorization of 28.

Give the prime factorization of 39

Give the prime factorization of 78

Give the prime factorization of 114.

Give the prime factorization of 54.

Give the prime factorization of 500.

Give the prime factorization of 100.

Give the prime factorization of 90.

Give the prime factorization of 50.

Give the prime factorization of 16.

Give the prime factorization of 24.

Give the prime factorization of 84.

 

What is the sum of the first 3 prime numbers?

Write the prime factorization for 12.

Write the definition of a prime number

What is the only number that is neither primer or composite.

 What can be said about the number 1?

 What can be said about the number 2?

 What can be said about any composite number?

 What can be said about any prime number?       

 

Prime Number Dice Roll a pair of dice and add. Is the

sum prime or composite? Suppose you had multiplied, would the product be prime or composite? Suppose you decide to play a game: one person scores a point for each prime number (obtained by either adding or multiplying) and the other person earns a point for each composite number he or she is able to obtain at a turn. Would this be a fair game? Why or

why not? (Note: I use two sets of numeral cards with digits 1-6 instead of dice)

 

Prime Numbers with the Hundred Board (Blackline

Master I – 76) In these hundred board activities students identify numbers less than 100 with only two factors, one and the number. These, of course, are prime and students can record these as such in their math journals.

There should be 25 numbers in this list of primes less than 100. All other positive numbers, except 1 which is neither prime nor composite, are composite. Ask students to imagine that they don’t have their list of primes and need to decide whether a given number is prime or composite. How might they approach this task? Would square tiles be useful? Would calculators be helpful? Allow students time to discuss this problem.

 

 

5 (squared)  x 3 (squared)  is the prime factorization for what number?

What is the largest prime factor of 200?

 

 

The digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 are

written on tiles and placed in a bag. Without

looking, Susan draws one tile, records the number,

replaces the tile, draws a second tile and records

that number. What is the probability that she will draw only one

prime number?

 

Draw a spinner, using numbers less than 20, that satisfies the following conditions:

• the probability of spinning a prime number is 25%

 

Prime or composite?

1. 2

2. 9

3. 29

4. 51

5. 77

6. 101

7. 231

8. 4,924

9. 1

10. 31

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2 Comments

Posted by on February 26, 2009 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Tags: , ,

2 responses to “Prime and Composite Numbers; Prime Factorization

  1. AprilS

    July 19, 2010 at 10:22 pm

    You know Prime Factorization is a big concept in math when mathematicians are all crazy over prime numbers. I love it too! Just finished my blog post on the same subject, check it out for a free video with Edward Burger teaching the concept:

    http://blog.thinkwell.com/2010/07/7th-grade-math-prime-factorization.html

     
  2. Guillermo Bautista

    July 21, 2010 at 7:42 am

    Hi I have created articles on prime numbers here:

    http://math4allages.wordpress.com/2010/06/14/prime-series-1/

    http://math4allages.wordpress.com/2010/06/21/prime-series-2/

    You may want to check it out.

     
 
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