RSS

Category Archives: Math: Assorted Topics

Number Word Practice – Decade Words

with number words instead of numbers. Answer must be written in number words.

image 

with number words instead of numbers. Answer must be written in number words.

image

I’ve got a similar worksheet over at the main TJ site for  number words zero – ten in the math section.

Advertisements
 
2 Comments

Posted by on April 15, 2010 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Tags: , ,

Preschool Math: Number Printables

 

(numeral that can be traced with the fingers; shows where to start when writing the numeral; word form, and objects) for numbers 1 – 10.

image

Some things we do with these: tracing with our fingers, spelling the number aloud, telling the number of letters in each word name, counting the objects on the card. I’ve also seen activities where the preschooler can use play dough and lay out some dough in the shape of a number on the cards (we laminated them). The cards can also be put in order from least to greatest, greatest to least; they can be used for counting.

 

– 3 way match, match all three (number/word/objects)

image

Match two cards at a time or all three for one number. 

 

Blackline Masters and Assessment Cards for Preschoolers/Kindergarteners

There’s a really nice site with free blackline masters (old term, lol, basically what teachers would make copies from in the “old days”) of preschool manipulatives (such as numeral cards, hundreds charts, place value strips, etc).   I remember using these materials (from this site) in my earlier days of homeschooling. 

They also have some helpful PDFS of teaching tips and math activities that you can do with younger students as well as some printable assessment cards to assess what skills your little one has and which ones need to be improved. (I plan on taking those right now as a start for our preschool math routine, insha Allah).

So if you get a chance, stop by and check it out as there are loads of useful goodies here…………Math Their Way Summary Newsletter

 

Happy Home Preschooling!

 

heart signature

 
2 Comments

Posted by on November 24, 2009 in Math: Assorted Topics, Preschool

 

Tags: , , , ,

Prime and Composite Numbers; Prime Factorization

We’re studying the above topic and here are some resources I found: (various grades from 3rd – 7th)

Prime and Composite Numbers

Prime Numbers Lesson Plan for Grades 3-4

Am I Prime? Lesson plan  for Grade 7

Prime Numbers Lesson Plan (PDF) for grades 4-6

Prime and Composite Numbers lesson plan for middle school

link to printable version of the above lesson plan

The Prime Team, sixth grade lesson plan

Prime and Composite Numbers with the use of manipulatives

 Cute activity using 100 chart. When student is finished crossing off numbers, only primes are left.

More than you probably ever want to know about prime numbers here. 🙂 Just thought my son would like the chart.

Prime Factorization and Factorization Trees

Why Learn Prime Factorization? How does it apply to the real world? (humorous and useful for those students who can’t focus on doing something  they don’t know why they are learning it)

 “Pretty Good Guide to Prime Factorization”

Lesson Plan on Prime Factorization and Factor Trees (PDF)

Seventh Grade Prime Factorization Lesson and practice (HTML)

Factoring Numbers Lesson from Purple Math

Modeling Prime Factorization Lesson

Prime and Composite Numbers/Prime Factorization  lesson plan from  lessonplanspage.com

I went through my NCDPI  (learnnc.org–NC has some of the best education stuff from state education departments that I have seen on the net) printables (Week by Week Essentials) and pulled out related prime/composite, prime factorization problems for quizzes, practice and warmups:

Prime/Composite Number Warmups/Quiz Material/Practice

Write the primer numbers between 1 and 10

Write the prime numbers between 10 and 20

Write the prime numbers between 20 and 30

Write the prime numbers between 30 and 40

Write the primer numbers between 40 and 50

Sum of the first four prime numbers

What is the sum of the first eight prime numbers.

List the prime factors of 35

Can the sum of two prime numbers be a prime

number? Explain.

List the prime numbers from 2 to 20

Largest prime factor of 100

Sum of the first five prime numbers

Give the prime factorization of 144.

Write the prime factorization of 1,408.

Give the prime factorization of 56.

Give the prime factorization of 375.

Write the prime factorization of 200.

Write the prime factorization of 162.

Write the prime factorization of 440.

Write the prime factorization of 600.

Write the prime factorization of 188.

Write the prime factorization of 48.

Give the prime factorization of 28.

Give the prime factorization of 39

Give the prime factorization of 78

Give the prime factorization of 114.

Give the prime factorization of 54.

Give the prime factorization of 500.

Give the prime factorization of 100.

Give the prime factorization of 90.

Give the prime factorization of 50.

Give the prime factorization of 16.

Give the prime factorization of 24.

Give the prime factorization of 84.

 

What is the sum of the first 3 prime numbers?

Write the prime factorization for 12.

Write the definition of a prime number

What is the only number that is neither primer or composite.

 What can be said about the number 1?

 What can be said about the number 2?

 What can be said about any composite number?

 What can be said about any prime number?       

 

Prime Number Dice Roll a pair of dice and add. Is the

sum prime or composite? Suppose you had multiplied, would the product be prime or composite? Suppose you decide to play a game: one person scores a point for each prime number (obtained by either adding or multiplying) and the other person earns a point for each composite number he or she is able to obtain at a turn. Would this be a fair game? Why or

why not? (Note: I use two sets of numeral cards with digits 1-6 instead of dice)

 

Prime Numbers with the Hundred Board (Blackline

Master I – 76) In these hundred board activities students identify numbers less than 100 with only two factors, one and the number. These, of course, are prime and students can record these as such in their math journals.

There should be 25 numbers in this list of primes less than 100. All other positive numbers, except 1 which is neither prime nor composite, are composite. Ask students to imagine that they don’t have their list of primes and need to decide whether a given number is prime or composite. How might they approach this task? Would square tiles be useful? Would calculators be helpful? Allow students time to discuss this problem.

 

 

5 (squared)  x 3 (squared)  is the prime factorization for what number?

What is the largest prime factor of 200?

 

 

The digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 are

written on tiles and placed in a bag. Without

looking, Susan draws one tile, records the number,

replaces the tile, draws a second tile and records

that number. What is the probability that she will draw only one

prime number?

 

Draw a spinner, using numbers less than 20, that satisfies the following conditions:

• the probability of spinning a prime number is 25%

 

Prime or composite?

1. 2

2. 9

3. 29

4. 51

5. 77

6. 101

7. 231

8. 4,924

9. 1

10. 31

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 26, 2009 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Tags: , ,

Math Library Guides for grades 2-6

I mentioned these guides in the previous post for sixth grade and up, here are grades 2-5 and grade 6 again……………..

 

Accelerated Math Library Guides

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 10, 2009 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Tags: , , , ,

Math Roundup

I was surfing for math resources today and for me, I hit the jackpot, so sharing…………………

1. Algebra PowerPoints. This site has loads of Algebra tutorial PowerPoints, they are arranged systematically I guess according to the book that is being used by that particular teacher.

Linked Math Matrices:
“The matrices are a series of online tables of electronic and technology resources supporting California middle school math content standards for grades 6, 7 and Algebra 1. The resources align to the two California state-adopted middle school textbook series of McDougall-Littell and Prentice Hall. The Grade 6 matrix also aligns to Harcourt and Scott Foresman.”
 
Basically locate a topic and find online resources to help you teach it or for practice for the student  🙂
 
Now, as someone who basically put together her own curriculum, this seemed like the best find of the day:
Library guides (Grades 6, 7, Pre Algebra and Algebra) from Accelerated Math (via another site). If you are making your own curriculum, you may find this very helpful. They are pdfs, which have a table of contents of topics, BUT under each topic is an objective, THEN for each objective, it gives sample problems.  So if you are making your own curriculum, you would have an idea of what types of problems to assign and you could look for worksheets or whatnot on the internet.  I thought this was really a find as I do make my own curriculum for most subjects and so often you come across  scope and sequences, which are helpful, but then you have to guess at what kinds of exercises to provide…
the seventh grade one is 152 pages! Haven’t gotten a chance to look at the others…………………..
 
Here are the links to the individual files:

Hope these resources are helpful………………………

 
Comments Off on Math Roundup

Posted by on February 10, 2009 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Number dictation

Here are some questions I came up to give dictation for writing “Arabic” (hindi) numerals. Of course it can also be used for “English” numbers as well.

 

Number Dictation

1. How many elephants are in the room? ___________

2. How many Gods are there? ___________

3. How many heads do you have? ___________

4. How many noses do you have? ___________

5. How many tigers are in the room? ___________

6. How many mountains are in the room? ___________

7. How many ears do you have? ___________

8. How many noses do you have? ___________

9. How many legs do you have? ___________

10. How many hands do you have? ___________

11. How many wheels are there on a tricycle? ___________

12. How many ears do you have? ___________

13. How many fingers do you have on one hand? ___________

14. How many legs do two people have? ___________

15. How many Pillars of Islam are there? ___________

16. How many legs does a cat have? ___________

17. How many legs are on a table? ___________

18. How many toes do you have on one foot? ___________

19. How many Pillars of Imaan are there? ___________

20. How many wheels are there on two tricycles? ___________

21. How many heavens are there ? ___________

22. How many legs are there on three people ? ___________

23. How many days of the week are there? ___________

24. How many Pillars of Imaan are there? ___________

25. How many wheels are there on two tricycles? ___________

26. How many heavens are there ? ___________

27. How many legs are there on three people ? ___________

28. How many days of the week are there? ___________

Give simple math problems

How old are you?

 
Comments Off on Number dictation

Posted by on December 4, 2008 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Introducing Odd and Even

I introduced the concept of odd and even today to my six year old and thought I would share my impromptu lesson.

 

1. Draw one dot with the numeral one over it:

     1

     .

2. Tell student that the one dot is alone, he has no partner (or friend). Because he is alone, we call him odd. Write the word odd under the dot):

1

.

odd

Tell student that Allah tells us He is odd, He is just one.

3. Next to the numeral 1, write a 2 with two dots under it:

1                        2

.                          ..   

odd

 

4. Make a circle around the two dots  under the numeral two making one group of two dots.

5. Tell student that the two dots make a pair (a pair is two things), the dots are not alone they are paired up. Since no one is left out (no dots, that is), we call the number two even. Write the word even under the two dots.

1                        2

.                          ..   

odd                  even

(the two dots under the two are circled into one group).

6. Next to the 2, write a 3 with 3 dots  under it.

7. Circle two dots to make a pair. Point to the one remaining dot and say, after we have made a pair, we have 1 dot left over.  When we have one dot left over, we say the number is odd, so 3 is an odd number. Write odd under the three dots.

8. Repeat this process for numbers 4-10. 

After  you get to about five, have student circle the pairs of dots (you may find that the student takes the initiative to circle the dots on her own).

Have student tell you if the number is odd or even by looking at whether or not there is an unpaired dot.

Be sure to write the word odd or even under each set of dots. (will come in handy next).

 9. When you have finished 10, go back to your drawings and start from the left and tell student to tell you which numbers are odd (they have odd written under them).  You (the teacher) write all the numbers as student says them. So you will have, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9. Over these numbers write the word odd.

10. Do the same thing (as in number 9) for the even numbers and write even over these numbers that student calls out: 2, 4, 6, 8.

11. Explain to student that the number 10 has two digits, a one and a zero.  Ask student what digit the 10 ends in. (zero). Tell student that a number ending in 0 is even and add this to your even number list above: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8.

12. Tell student when a number (no matter how big (i.e. how many digits) it has, when it ends in 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 (pointing to your list), the number is odd.

Give student a number such as 41. Ask what number it ends in (1) and then if it is odd or even (refer student to your chart you just made if necessary).

Tell student when a number (no matter how big (i.e. how many digits) it has, when it ends in o, 2, 4, 6, 8 (pointing to your list), the number is even.

Give student the number 32. Ask what number it ends in (2) and then if it is odd or even (refer student to your chart you just made if necessary).

13. Give student several numbers (from 1 digit up to 5 or whatever) and have student tell if that number is odd or even, you might want to have student write the words odd or even for each one.  If necessary, draw a line under the last digit as a reminder of where to look to tell if the number is odd or even. You can let student use the chart.

For subsequent sessions/practice

Give student worksheets of numbers to write whether the numbers are odd or even.  You can have student draw dots  corresponding to the last digit and make pairs to determine if the number is odd/even. When student understands, she can use the chart or do the work on her own without it.

 

Be sure to review the concept daily (orally or written).

Doesn’t have to be anything big, just call out a few  numbers and ask student if they are odd/even. You might also incorporate the review into lessons; for example, if student is working on addition, ask if the sum of the problem they just did is odd or even.

 

 

More resources:

Mosey on over to the main TJ site’s odd/even page for

  • odd/even for a premade odd/even chart
  • links for more odd/even lesson ideas and games
  • places to print out premade or generated odd/even worksheets.

Go to www.talibiddeenjr.com and then to the math section. Under the math section, go to Odd/Even page.  (I’m having trouble accessing the site from this computer right now, so I can’t put in the direct link).

 

 

 

 
4 Comments

Posted by on November 3, 2008 in Math: Assorted Topics

 

Tags: ,